Bigfoot  Trail  Alliance

Board of Directors

Michael Kauffmann

Michael Kauffmann

Michael Kauffmann

Works as an author, educator, grant writer, and researcher in Humboldt County, California. For the past 5 years, he has written and managed state and federal education grants to enhance the county’s educational systems. Currently he is the project director of a CaMSP STEM Grant and beginning work on a bigcone Douglas-fir mapping and monitoring project in the San Gabriel Mountain National Monument.

Michael lives in Kneeland, California, with his wife, Allison, his son, Sylas, and dog, Skylar where the family enjoys building forts and trails in their 5-acre redwood forest. He first hiked the BFT in 2009, authored the original write-up in 2010, and co-authored V2.2015. He is the author of three books: Conifer Country, Conifers of the Pacific Slope, and Field Guide to Manzanitas, which explore the natural history of the West and holds a MA in Biology from Humboldt State University (see C.V. HERE).


Rees Hughes

Rees Hughes

Rees Hughes

Walked his way through some of the most stunning regions on Earth — from the top of Kilimanjaro to the arid interior of Australia, from the pilgrimage route up Sri Pada in Sri Lanka to the picturesque Cornish coast, from the Himalayas to the Andes — but has found little that compares with the magic of the Klamath Knot. Co-editor of The Pacific Crest Trailside Readers, Rees is currently working on a guide to Humboldt County walks, serves as a volunteer trail steward coordinator, and an advocate for the Humboldt Bay Trail.

Rees retired from a career in higher education after more than three decades at Humboldt State University, Seattle University, and the University of Kansas.  He has a PhD from the University of Washington.

 


Mitch Timbanard

Mitch Timbanard

Mitch Timbanard

Mitch been an avid outdoor enthusiast, advocate and traveler since he was an undergrad at UC Berkeley; spending much of his free time backpacking and hiking in the Sierra Nevada and the Trinity Alps.  After college, Mitch worked as a naturalist for four years inspiring children to love and protect the natural world.  From there, he earned a degree in law and now works as a Public Defender in Orange County, California.  He still manages to travel, climb and hike and looks forward to the day when he can walk the Bigfoot Trail.

 

 


Jason Barnes

Originally from Michigan, Jason traveled west as a teenager to get a taste of the mountains. He was immediately hooked and soon began working seasonally in Yosemite National Park while also pursuing backpacking, rock climbing, and photography. While working for the National Park Service he was introduced to Geographical Information Systems (GIS). Soon after, he moved to Northern California to attain a certificate, and later a Masters in GIS. He served as an officer for the Northern California region of the American Society for Photogrammetry & Remote Sensing (ASPRS) for five years. While living in Humboldt County, Jason discovered the Trinity Alps Wilderness and Klamath Mountains and began using his GIS skills toward citizen science projects involving lake bathymetry, glacier monitoring, and trail advocacy. When not hiking in the wilderness, he can be seen cycling the trails and roads of Humboldt County, exploring backroads on his dual-sport motorcycle, or capturing footage with his quad-copter. Jason is the co-author of the newest Bigfoot Trail map set – V2.2015

 


Ian Nelson

Ian Nelson

Ian Nelson

Spent his formative years connecting with nature in the marshes and waters of the Chesapeake Bay.  Yet, he was always drawn to the mountains.  While earning a degree in Forestry and Wildlife from Virginia Tech, he spent many a weekend exploring the mountains of Southern Appalachia.  After graduating, Ian worked as an environmental educator on the Chesapeake Bay before making his way west to teach environmental education in California.  That is where Ian met his wife Amy, who shared a passion for being outside and getting to know the wild lands.  Eventually, Ian and Amy were married and settled in Southern Oregon where Ian has been the Pacific Crest Trail Association’s Regional Representative for Northern California and Southern Oregon for the past 10 years.


Sage Clegg

Sage-Clegg

Sage Clegg

Loves walking in wild places & is drawn to unfinished, rugged routes in hidden corners of the west. Since discovering thru-hiking on the Grand Enchantment Trail in 2008, she has completed the triple crown of thru-hikes (PCT, CDT, AT), as well as a handful of shorter, less traveled routes, including the Oregon Desert Trail & her own trail, the Japhy Ryder Route. When she heard of the Bigfoot Trail it seemed like a good fit, & in July 2014 thru-hiked it north bound.

Growing up in Mendocino County (Willits), Sage knew the north western corner of California was something special and unique. She left Mendocino County for college at UC Santa Cruz. After College she instructed backpacking courses for Outward Bound in Montana, Texas, & the Sierras for the better part of a decade. In 2008 she started working as a Desert Tortoise biologist in the Mojave Desert, spending spring & fall with tortoises, & thru-hiking during her off seasons. In 2011 Sage met her partner, Adam Drummer, & moved from the back of her truck into a house in Bend. The couple migrates to the Mojave for work every spring and fall, swinging by Bigfoot country when they can.


Emily Sinkhorn

Has a passion for all things trails, forests and community. Since moving to the northwest in 2004, her favorite places to roam have been the less-traveled forests and streams of the Klamath Mountains and Oregon Coast Range.

Emily-SinkhornEmily works with the non-profit Redwood Community Action Agency, collaborating to further active transportation and community-led change in Humboldt County. She leads many Safe Routes to School, trail and community-building projects and co-founded the Community Bike Kitchen in Eureka. Since 2011, Emily has co-hosted a weekly trails radio show “Happy Trails” on KHUM in Humboldt County, focusing on local efforts to a complete a regional trail system and sharing successes from other communities.

Emily can often be found cycling the roads and trails Humboldt County, do-si-do-ing at a barn dance or organizing a local event or meeting.  She lives in lovely, funky Eureka in a great old house with her partner Dan and cat Snowball.

  • Michael Kauffmann

    Laura- Thanks for the comment. I think you will be pleasantly surprised by the Klamath Mountains compared to the Sierra. Water is, even in our recent drought, relatively plentiful. Please take note from the maps when it there are stretches without. Mary Kwart hiked it last year and has provided some of her own resources HERE, which I think include her water availability document. Happy Trails! -Michael